We are happy being able to invite you to the third edition of our annual workshop on trust in automated vehicles! 

 

Properly calibrated trust is a key issue for a successful implementation of automated vehicle technology. Recent research and investigation of accidents involving automated driving systems have shown that drivers have difficulties adjusting their trust levels appropriately with system performance criteria, which is a key requirement for trust calibration. Whereas previous editions of this workshop have concentrated on suitable definitions, measurements, and factors influencing trust, this year’s edition shifts the focus to the question: How does trust interact with and influence other latent constructs, such as risk behavior, situation awareness, or users’ willingness to engage in non-driving related tasks? The workshop thereby welcomes both experts and young researchers who (already are or want to) conduct research in this timely area, with the aim of developing concrete research programs and experimental designs, that close existing knowledge gaps and allow further progress in the domain of trust calibration.  

 

 

Above you can see some impressions of last years workshop, and you can expect it to be no less fun this year!

 

In this third edition, we want to continue by now shifting the focus outwards and examine how trust interacts with and influences different variables and in turn how these interactions change behavior. Relevant factors to be investigated are (beside risk and/or situation awareness as described above), for example, drivers’ willingness to engage in non-driving related activities (such as indulging drowsiness).

 

When and Where?

Sunday, September 22

9:00AM - 1:00PM

 

AutoUI 2019

Utrecht, NL

Process

The third WS on trust addresses experts in the field as well as researchers in their early carreer who want to tackle this important topic. Following a moderated expert panel, breakout groups will develop research programs which bring us further in solving trust-related issues.